TIMEPIECE | SANDBOX FILMS


TIMEPIECE, REVISITING THE PEOPLE, PLACES, AND THINGS THAT SHAPED SNOWBOARDING IN CANADA

What started as a joint venture between two fringe crews became one of Canada’s most influential video production companies. In 2004 the Skids were infamous for their Mt. Seymour-centric party vids; Crapneto was known for silly online featurettes. Mikee HK of Crapneto fame did the initial Sandbox branding, while Kevin Sansalone, Clayton Larsen and Aaron Leyland made the collaboration come to life. Sandbox brought out the best in the riders and elevated the production value while softening the shenanigans. The initial self-titled Sandbox film started a seven-year run of acclaimed videos known for progressive riding, clever intros, and introducing new Canadian talent to the masses. Kevin and Clayton’s Sandbox videos focused on the up-and-coming and underground riders from Ontario to Vancouver Island. These films played a huge role in Canada’s snowboard community and were instrumental in helping form the careers of snowboarders and filmmakers still doing it today. Revisit the entire Sandbox archive at youtube.com/sandboxlandvideos 


• Sandbox delivered annual films from 2004 to 2011. A few notable riders who got their start in Sandbox films were: Dustin Craven, Mark Sollors, Andrew Geeves, Rusty Ockenden, Jake Kuzyk, Brendan Keenan, Geoff Brown and Jody Wachniak.

• In 2010, while filming for Now You Know, Sandbox was the first to use a drone in the streets. At the time drones were giant gas-powered machines that needed to be transported by truck and took two people to operate.

• Jake Kuzyk was initially brought into Sandbox to help Andrew Geeves and capture second angles before getting to hit a few spots himself. Jake jumped into the mix the following season, riding into his closing part in 2009’s Shine On.

• The first video clips of Mark McMorris appeared in Sandbox’s Now You Know. At the time Mark was 15 years old, riding for O’Neil and Class Five snowboards. He rode in front of the camera for one session and did a flawless Backside 1260 and Cab 1260, tricks that blew minds at the time.

• At their peak, Sandbox was selling 30,000 DVD’s a release and premiering in bars and shops around the world.


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